Famous Irish Movies

The Field is a 1990 Irish drama film written and directed by Jim Sheridan and starring Richard Harris, John Hurt, Sean…

The Field

The Field is a 1990 Irish drama film written and directed by Jim Sheridan and starring Richard Harris, John Hurt, Sean Bean, Brenda Fricker and Tom Berenger. It was adapted from John B. Keane’s 1965 play of the same name. The film is set in the early 1930s in a very underdeveloped region of rural Ireland.

The Field was shot almost entirely in the Connemara village of Leenane, overshadowed by the wet and misty mountains of Connemara and Mayo. The pub scenes in the film were shot in Gaynor’s, one of three bars which serve this tiny one-street village


The Wind That Shakes the Barley

The Wind That Shakes the Barley is a 2006 war drama film directed by Ken Loach, set during the Irish War of Independence (1919–1921) and the Irish Civil War (1922–1923). This drama tells the fictional story of two County Cork brothers, who join the Irish Republican Army to fight for Irish independence from the United Kingdom.

The film was shot in various towns within County Cork during 2005, including Ballyvourney and Timoleague. Some filming took place in Bandon, County Cork: a scene was shot along North Main Street and outside a building next to the Court House.


In the Name of the Father

TUnemployed young Irishman Gerry Conlon (Daniel Day-Lewis) gets by as a petty thief in 1970s Belfast. When local IRA leaders get fed up with him, he flees to England and meets up with his friend Paul Hill (John Lynch). On the same night that the IRA bombs a nearby pub, the friends get kicked out of their communal digs and are forced to sleep in a park.

To prepare for the role of Gerry Conlon, Day-Lewis lost over 50 pounds in weight. To gain an insight into Conlon’s thoughts and feelings at the time, Day-Lewis also spent three days and nights in a jail cell. 


Michael Collins (Film)

Michael Collins is a 1996 historical biopic written and directed by Neil Jordan and starring Liam Neeson as Michael Collins, the Irish patriot and revolutionary who died in the Irish Civil War. It won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival. Despite containing several brutal scenes of violence, the film was given a very lenient ‘PG’ rating in Ireland mainly because of its historical context.

Although based on historical events, the film does contain some alterations and fictionalisations, such as the dramatised circumstances of Harry Boland’s death and Ned Broy’s fate, and significant altercations to the formative years of Dáil Éireann and the prelude to the events of the first “Bloody Sunday” at Croke Park.